Article abstract

International Journal of Biotechnology and Food Science

Research Article | Published September 2017 | Volume 5, Issue 3, pp. 32-41

 

Identification and quantification of isoflavones in Bangladeshi soy-milk, masoor and mung dals

 

 

 

 

 

 Farzana Saleh1*

 Nilufar Nahar2

 Mohammad Shoeb2

 Zerin Sultana2

 M. Mosihuzzaman3

 Mamunar Rashid1

 

  Email Author

 Tel: +8801738085007

 

 

    1.    Department of Community Nutrition, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences (BUHS), 125/1 Darussalam Mirpur-1, Dhaka-1216, Bangladesh.

 

   2.    Department of Chemistry, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh.

 

  3.    Department of Chemistry, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences (BUHS), 125/1 Darussalam Mirpur-1, Dhaka-1216, Bangladesh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Citation: Saleh F, Nahar N, Shoeb M, Sultana Z, Mosihuzzaman M, Rashid M (2017). Identification and quantification of isoflavones in Bangladeshi soy-milk, masoor and mung dals. Int. J. Biotechnol. Food Sci. 5(3): 32-41.

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 Abstract 


The present study was carried out to identify and quantify of the isoflavones in soybean, masoor dal, mung dal produced in Bangladesh. An amount of 350 ml soy-milk was prepared from 100 g powdered bean following standard procedure and kept in a refrigerator. The milk was then kept in four flasks, frozen in a methanol freezer, and dried into powder with a freeze-dryer. The dried soy-milk, masoor dal and mung dal powders were refluxed with n-hexane in boiling water to remove oil/fatty materials from it, and ethyl acetate was used for extracting the oil-free powder. The ethyl acetate extract of these three foods was dried completely, re-dissolved in a definite amount of acetonitrile (ACN), and analyzed by HPLC-PDA on C18 column using mobile phase, ACN-H2O (75:25; flow rate: 0.5 ml/min; wavelength: 268 nm, loop size: 20 µlm, and running time: 10 min). Genistein and daidzein were identified in the oil-free sample extracts by comparing the retention time of the certified standard genistein and daidzein, purchased from Sigma-Aldrich. The quantification of isoflavones was done using the external calibration curve of the two certified samples, which was linear (r2 for genistein and daidzein was 0.999 and 0.997 respectively). LOD (S/N ratio-3:1) and LOQ (S/N ratio-10:1) were, respectively, 0.0045 and 0.0135 ppm and 0.25 and 0.75 ppm, in genistein and daidzein. Daidzein and genistein were identified in the locally-produced soybean, masoor dal, and mung dal, and the number of total isoflavones in the foods were within the acceptable range.

Keywords  Isoflavones   daidzein   genistein   HPLC-PDA   soy-milk   masoor dal   mung dal   Bangladesh




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